Provide at least 3 citations and references.

 

Open Discussion: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Family Settings Versus Individual Settings

To prepare:

 

Review the media, Johnson Family Session 3, in this week’s Learning Resources

 

 

· and consider the insights provided on CBT in family therapy.

· Reflect on your practicum experiences with CBT in family and individual settings.

Note:  For this Discussion, you are required to complete your initial post before you will be able to view and respond to your colleagues’ postings.

 

THE DISCUSSION

· Post an explanation of how the use of CBT in families compares to CBT in individual settings.

· Provide specific examples from your own practicum experiences.

· Then, explain challenges counselors might encounter when using CBT in the family setting.

· Support your position with specific examples from this week’s media.

 

Reading Resources

Required Readings

American Nurses Association. (2014). Psychiatric-mental health nursing: Scope and standards of practice (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

· Standard 5F “Milieu Therapy” (pages 60-61)

 

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

 

 

Bond, C., Woods, K., Humphrey, N., Symes, W., & Green, L. (2013). Practitioner review: The effectiveness of solution focused brief therapy with children and families: A systematic and critical evaluation of the literature from 1990-2010. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 54(7), 707-723. doi:10.1111/jcpp.12058

 

 

Conoley, C., Graham, J., Neu, T., Craig, M., O’Pry, A., Cardin, S., & … Parker, R. (2003). Solution-focused family therapy with three aggressive and oppositional-acting children: An N=1 empirical study. Family Process, 42(3), 361-374.  doi:10.1111/j.1545-5300.2003.00361.x

 

 

de Castro, S., & Guterman, J. (2008). Solution-focused therapy for families coping with suicide. Journal of Marital & Family Therapy, 34(1), 93-106. doi: 10.111/j.1752-0606.2008.00055.x.

 

Nichols, M., & Davis, S. D. (2020). The essentials of family therapy (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.

· Chapter 9, “Cognitive-Behavioral Family Therapy” (pp. 132-149)

· Chapter 12, “Solution-Focused Therapy” (pp. 175-188)

 

Patterson, T. (2014). A cognitive behavioral systems approach to family therapy. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 25(2), 132-144. doi:10.1080/08975353.2014.910023

 

 

Perry, A. (2014). Cognitive behavioral therapy with couples and families. Sexual & Relationship Therapy, 29(3), 366-367. doi:10.1080/14681994.2014.909024

 

 

Ramisch, J., McVicker, M., & Sahin, Z. (2009). Helping low-conflict divorced parents establish appropriate boundaries using a variation of the miracle question: An integration of solution-focused therapy and structural family therapy. Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 50(7), 481-495.  doi:10.1080/10502550902970587

 

 

Ramisch, J., McVicker, M., & Sahin, Z. (2009). Helping low-conflict divorced parents establish appropriate boundaries using a variation of the miracle question: An integration of solution-focused therapy and structural family therapy. Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 50(7), 481-495.  doi:10.1080/10502550902970587

 

 

Washington, K. T., Wittenberg-Lyles, E., Parker Oliver, D., Baldwin, P. K., Tappana, J., Wright, J. H., & Demiris, G. (2014). Rethinking family caregiving: Tailoring cognitive–behavioral therapies to the hospice experience. Health & Social Work, 39(4), 244-250. doi:hsw/hlu031

 

Wheeler, K. (Ed.). (2014). Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: A how-to guide for evidence-based practice. New York, NY: Springer.

· Chapter 12, “Family Therapy” (Review pp. 429–468.)

 

Document: Group Therapy Progress Note

 

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2013c). Johnson family session 3 [Video file]. Author: Baltimore, MD.

 

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 5 minutes.

Accessible player

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Family Settings Versus Individual Settings

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a therapeutic approach the therapist uses to problem-solve with a goal during the session (Wheeler, 2014). It helps the client gain insight into the weird ways of perceiving things to strengthen the client to change the thinking pattern that will change the person’s behavior that triggers their challenges (Nichols, 2014). CBT is scientific and effectively treats anxiety disorder and other psychological disorders in adolescents and adults (Hayes & Hofmann, 2017).

Individual Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Therapists use the CBT approach on an individual or in a group setting. Psychotherapist recommends CBT to an individual to change irrational and stress-producing thoughts to a more productive one. The individual with anxiety and substance abuse disorders uses CBT to learn various mechanisms to reduce harm. There are three phases of CBT treatment. The client will enumerate personal challenges, develop treatment plans, and participate actively in the treatment plan (Maric et al. 2018). The second phase involves increasing coping competence to decrease challenging behaviors. The third involves the termination phase and strategies put in place to prevent relapse.

Family Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

In the family setting, CBT supports family members to change specific behavior that will accommodate more appropriate behavior. CBT for family channels on supporting family members to learn on making appropriate decisions that will meet their needs, thereby ensuring calmer and friendlier environments. CBT for the family is short and focuses on solutions that will address various psychological problems like depression, anxiety, anger outbursts, acting out behavior, obesity, addictions, and coping with physical illness (Maric et al., 2018). Here, a family member’s emotion or conduct can influence the client (Nichols, 2014).

Patient Example

An example is a 14-year Hispanic American AA that lives with her adopted parents’ RA (mom), 65 years, and CA (dad), 67 years old. AA exhibits depression symptoms and shares that she is always having issues with the adopted dad than the mom. AA stated many crying, screaming, clamoring, high emotion, and an unknown reason; the whole family cannot get along. Dad complains, AA steals, cannot follow simple family rules, and is not interested in school. RA (mom) complains they adopted to provide future and support to AA, but it is not working out. AA reports she is tired of living with the adopted parents and cannot wait to turn eighteen years to live the house. AA ’s attitude affects the couple and the family, and the couple are feeling remorse for embarking on the rescue mission. The therapist decides to schedule AA and her adopted parents for CBT as a family group therapy. AA will attend CBT as an individual also.

The goal of the therapy for AA is to help her develop and improve the positive thought process; this is achievable using diverse behavioral and cognitive approaches (Hayes & Hofmann, 2017). The CBT for the whole family focuses on improving the family relationship and dynamics.

The challenges

The therapist must consider the whole family when providing CBT for family compared to an individual. The focus is not only on one individual but also on the entire family members’ concerns as a unit. The therapist must be consistent not to deviate from group therapy’s goal by focusing on one individual member’s need, neglecting others’ needs.

Time management is also a factor the therapist will consider ensuring each family member has the same amount of therapy time to verbalize and express concerns and emotions. According to Patterson (2014), family members are encouraged to verbalize their feelings and emotions and intellectual reasons (cognition) motivating (instigating) those feelings.

AA shared confidential information with the therapist during individual therapy. The therapist will need to obtain permission from the client before disclosing the information during family CBT.

The therapist must not forget the ethical principle to keep the patient information private and use it for the treatment purpose unless there is a risk of dangers to self or others (Riva & Cornish, 2018).

Lastly, the therapist must not be judgmental when performing the CBT for the couple.

Conclusion

Individual and group CBT is beneficial in treating virtually every type of disorder. Several individuals may benefit from individual therapy, while others may be more fitting for group therapy. Neither individual nor group therapy is better than the other. They use different approaches and treatment purposes to reach similar goals.

 

References

Hayes, S. C., & Hofmann, S. G. (2017). The third wave of cognitive-behavioral therapy and the rise of process‐based care. World Psychiatry, 16(3), 245.

Maric, M., van Steensel, F. J., & Bögels, S. M. (2018). Parental involvement in CBT for anxiety-disordered youth revisited: family CBT outperforms child CBT in the long term for children with comorbid ADHD symptoms. Journal of attention disorders, 22(5), 506-514.

Nichols, M. P. (2014). The essentials of family therapy.

Patterson, T. (2014). Cognitive-Behavioral systems approach family therapy. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 25(2), 366-367. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14681994.2014.909024.

Riva, M. T., & Cornish, J. A. E. (2018). 11 Ethical Considerations in Group Psychotherapy. The Cambridge Handbook of Applied Psychological Ethics.

Wheeler, K. (2014). Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: A how-to

Guide for evidence-based practice. New York, NY: Springer.

 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Family Settings Versus Individual Settings

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a therapeutic approach the therapist uses to problem-solve with a goal during the session (Wheeler, 2014). It helps the client gain insight into the weird ways of perceiving things to strengthen the client to change the thinking pattern that will change the person’s behavior that triggers their challenges (Nichols, 2014). CBT is scientific and effectively treats anxiety disorder and other psychological disorders in adolescents and adults (Hayes & Hofmann, 2017).

Individual Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Therapists use the CBT approach on an individual or in a group setting. Psychotherapist recommends CBT to an individual to change irrational and stress-producing thoughts to a more productive one. The individual with anxiety and substance abuse disorders uses CBT to learn various mechanisms to reduce harm. There are three phases of CBT treatment. The client will enumerate personal challenges, develop treatment plans, and participate actively in the treatment plan (Maric et al. 2018). The second phase involves increasing coping competence to decrease challenging behaviors. The third involves the termination phase and strategies put in place to prevent relapse.

Family Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

In the family setting, CBT supports family members to change specific behavior that will accommodate more appropriate behavior. CBT for family channels on supporting family members to learn on making appropriate decisions that will meet their needs, thereby ensuring calmer and friendlier environments. CBT for the family is short and focuses on solutions that will address various psychological problems like depression, anxiety, anger outbursts, acting out behavior, obesity, addictions, and coping with physical illness (Maric et al., 2018). Here, a family member’s emotion or conduct can influence the client (Nichols, 2014).

Patient Example

An example is a 14-year Hispanic American AA that lives with her adopted parents’ RA (mom), 65 years, and CA (dad), 67 years old. AA exhibits depression symptoms and shares that she is always having issues with the adopted dad than the mom. AA stated many crying, screaming, clamoring, high emotion, and an unknown reason; the whole family cannot get along. Dad complains, AA steals, cannot follow simple family rules, and is not interested in school. RA (mom) complains they adopted to provide future and support to AA, but it is not working out. AA reports she is tired of living with the adopted parents and cannot wait to turn eighteen years to live the house. AA ’s attitude affects the couple and the family, and the couple are feeling remorse for embarking on the rescue mission. The therapist decides to schedule AA and her adopted parents for CBT as a family group therapy. AA will attend CBT as an individual also.

The goal of the therapy for AA is to help her develop and improve the positive thought process; this is achievable using diverse behavioral and cognitive approaches (Hayes & Hofmann, 2017). The CBT for the whole family focuses on improving the family relationship and dynamics.

The challenges

The therapist must consider the whole family when providing CBT for family compared to an individual. The focus is not only on one individual but also on the entire family members’ concerns as a unit. The therapist must be consistent not to deviate from group therapy’s goal by focusing on one individual member’s need, neglecting others’ needs.

Time management is also a factor the therapist will consider ensuring each family member has the same amount of therapy time to verbalize and express concerns and emotions. According to Patterson (2014), family members are encouraged to verbalize their feelings and emotions and intellectual reasons (cognition) motivating (instigating) those feelings.

AA shared confidential information with the therapist during individual therapy. The therapist will need to obtain permission from the client before disclosing the information during family CBT.

The therapist must not forget the ethical principle to keep the patient information private and use it for the treatment purpose unless there is a risk of dangers to self or others (Riva & Cornish, 2018).

Lastly, the therapist must not be judgmental when performing the CBT for the couple.

Conclusion

Individual and group CBT is beneficial in treating virtually every type of disorder. Several individuals may benefit from individual therapy, while others may be more fitting for group therapy. Neither individual nor group therapy is better than the other. They use different approaches and treatment purposes to reach similar goals.

 

References

Hayes, S. C., & Hofmann, S. G. (2017). The third wave of cognitive-behavioral therapy and the rise of process‐based care. World Psychiatry, 16(3), 245.

Maric, M., van Steensel, F. J., & Bögels, S. M. (2018). Parental involvement in CBT for anxiety-disordered youth revisited: family CBT outperforms child CBT in the long term for children with comorbid ADHD symptoms. Journal of attention disorders, 22(5), 506-514.

Nichols, M. P. (2014). The essentials of family therapy.

Patterson, T. (2014). Cognitive-Behavioral systems approach family therapy. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 25(2), 366-367. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14681994.2014.909024.

Riva, M. T., & Cornish, J. A. E. (2018). 11 Ethical Considerations in Group Psychotherapy. The Cambridge Handbook of Applied Psychological Ethics.

Wheeler, K. (2014). Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: A how-to

Guide for evidence-based practice. New York, NY: Springer.

 
Do you need a similar assignment done for you from scratch? We have qualified writers to help you. We assure you an A+ quality paper that is free from plagiarism. Order now for an Amazing Discount!
Use Discount Code "Newclient" for a 15% Discount!

NB: We do not resell papers. Upon ordering, we do an original paper exclusively for you.